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Distance Learning Uncategorized Young Naturalists Club

Virtual Field Trip: Halloween Special on Fear in Nature

What is fear?

Fear is a part of our everyday life. It may even have evolved because it is useful: fear helps us recognize danger, so that we can survive!

But sometimes, we are afraid even where there is not danger. Many people are afraid of spiders, the dark, or snakes. But you weren’t born with these fears. You learned them.

The best way to get over your fears? Learn about them! On this week’s virtual field trip, we’ll talk about spiders and other crawly creatures. Face your fears with us, and see if it changes your mind!

CHOOSE HOW YOU WILL FACE YOUR FEARS:

Attend the virtual field trip, Friday, October 30th at 10:30. Meet spiders and other crawly creatures.

Play the Spider Memory game! It will help you learn which Ohio spiders are harmless or venomous.

Interview a spider: Find a spider to observe. You may find it is more cool than scary.

Virtual Field Trip on Zoom: Friday, October 30 at 10:30am

I think this jumping spider is actually pretty cute.

Join us Halloween zoom special as we discuss many common outdoor fears! Learn what you should be careful of in the woods, and what is actually harmless.

We’ll meet a not-so-scary animal with no legs! And a few other animals with lots of legs. Spider expert Sarah Rose will visit to teach us about ways spiders hunt.

You are welcome to share what you are afraid of in nature, big or small.

Register for fall field trips!

~~We’ll post the recording of the event here by the following Monday.~~

Can’t make it? Read on to try some fear-conquering activities on your own!

Get to Know Ohio’s Spiders

a white-banded crab spider sitting in the center of a passionflower
Can you spot the white-banded crab spider in this picture? Darcy found it camouflaged on the passionflowers in her garden.

What role do spiders play in the ecosystem?

Spiders are predators, which means they eat other insects and even each other.  Predators are an important part of the food web. They help control insect populations:

  • They can help control indoor pest infestations (so your house isn’t overwhelmed with bugs)
  • They help control pest infestations in agricultural fields (so that insects don’t eat everything in farmers’ fields or gardens).

Humans and Spiders:  Do we need to be scared of spiders?

Are you scared of spiders? Many people have a fear of spiders. This is known as arachnophobia. But here are some reasons you don’t need to be afraid!

  • Most spiders do have venom.  But this venom is not harmful to humans! It is for hunting their small prey.
  • Spiders rarely bite humans. We think spiders bite more often than they actually do. This is because doctors have misdiagnosed bites and people have misidentified spiders.

Want to learn more?

Check out the Ohio Department of Natural Resource Spiders of Ohio Guide (pdf) to learn about 54 more spiders found in Ohio: 

Play the spider memory game

Go through this presentation to learn about 10 spiders found in Ohio.  At the end of the presentation, play 3 rounds of memory to become an expert identifier of these 10 spiders!

Here’s a video with instructions on playing the game:

You might have noticed that there are only two spiders in Ohio whose bites could be serious: the recluse and the black widow. They are rare spiders! Learn more about the rare biting spiders in Ohio here.

Try this: Interview a Spider

Our friend met a yellow garden spider!

Conduct an interview with a spider! You will need a paper & writing utensil to take notes during your interview.

First, go outside and try to find a spider. Here are some tips for finding your 8-legged friend:

  • Flip over some old logs or stones.
  • Look in webs between trees or on the outside of buildings.
  • Use a stick to look through leaf litter on the ground or in tall grass

Like we said above, there are only two spiders in Ohio that are a concern for human health:

  • Brown recluses are all brown with darker “violin shape” on their abdomen. Ohio is at the far edge of their home range, so they are rare.
  • Black widows are a shiny black, with a bright red hourglass or triangles on their belly.

    You can safely ask any other spider for an interview. That means most of the spiders you meet!

Once you find a spider, do not pick it up or trap it in anything. Just observe politely!

During the interview, pretend you are following the spider around like a news reporter, documenting the daily life of the spider.

I met this fishing spider on a tree. After a nice interview, it told me it was on its way to go fishing for insects at the creek.

You can also try asking your spider its name. But if it doesn’t answer, check out the ODNR Spiders of Ohio guide to see if you can identify it.

Here are some activities you can do during your interview:

  • Draw a picture or take a picture of the spider
  • Once you identify the spider, note 3 facts from the field guide about the spider.
  • Observe the spider’s actions during your interview. Is the spider fast or slow? Is it hiding or hunting bugs? Can the spider jump or swim?
  • What is interesting to you about the spider? Is there any bright colors on the spider? Is there anything unique about the spider?

After your interview is over, share your interview with a friend or family member. Or tell us about it in the comments below!

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